plastic bagsPlastic waste is a big problem throughout the world, including in New Jersey.

Plastic is a cheap material that is basically indestructible.

In fact, it never completely biodegrades, but instead, breaks into tiny particles that infest the Delaware River and the Atlantic Ocean.

Proposed State-Wide Plastic Ban

The New Jersey state government is currently debating a bill that would attempt to decrease plastic. The proposed bill would ban plastic grocery store bags, straws, cups, carryout containers, food trays, and egg cartons. It would also instate a $0.10 fee on paper shopping bags.

Other states–including Hawaii and California–have enacted similar legislation, but if this new bill passes, it will be the most drastic yet.

The bill still needs to pass a number of legal steps before it becomes law, but it is beginning to attract attention, including from the plastic industry. 

Click here to read the full story.

Active & Pending Local Plastic Bans in New Jersey Towns

Several towns throughout New Jersey have existing bans in an effort to prevent plastic consumption in the Garden State.

Plastic bans are in effect in these towns:

  • Avalon: Ban on single-use plastic bags and polystyrene containers
  • Beach Haven: Ban on single-use plastic bags
  • Belmar: Ban on single-use plastic bags
  • Bradley Beach: Ban on single-use plastic bags and a $.05 charge on single-use paper bags
  • Brigantine:  Ban on single-use plastic bags
  • Harvey Cedars: Ban on single-use plastic bags
  • Highland Park: $.10 fee on single-use plastic bags. In November, this will move to a ban on plastic bags and $.10 fee on paper bags
  • Hoboken: Ban on single-use plastic bags and up to a $.25 fee on paper bags
  • Jersey City: Ban on single-use plastic bags
  • Lambertville: Ban on single-use plastic bags, plastic straws, and polystyrene food containers. Until January 2020, this is voluntary.
  • Long Beach: Ban on single-use plastic bags
  • Longport: Ban on single-use plastic bags, unless a customer specifically requests one at a $.10 fee.
  • Maplewood: Ban on single-use plastic bags, $.05 fee on paper bags
  • Monmouth Beach: Ban on single-use plastic bags, plastic straws, and polystyrene food containers
  • Point Pleasant Beach: Ban on single-use plastic bags
  • Somers Point: Ban on single-use plastic bags
  • Stafford: Ban on single-use plastic bags
  • Stone Harbor: Ban on single-use plastic bags, plastic utensils, and polystyrene food containers

Plastic bans are pending in these towns:

  • Asbury Park: Ban on single-use plastic bags, with a fee of up to $.25 on paper bags
  • Bayonne: Ban on single-use plastic bags and straws
  • Glen Rock: Ban on single-use plastic bags, up to a $.10 fee on reusable and paper bags
  • Hopewell: Ban on single-use plastic bags
  • Little Silver: Ban on single-use plastic bags, straws, and polystyrene food containers
  • Ocean Gate: Ban on single-use plastic bags, straws, and polystyrene food containers
  • Parsippany-Troy Hills: Ban on single-use plastic bags, with a fee of up to $.25 on paper bags
  • Ridgewood Village: Ban on single-use plastic bags, with a fee on paper bags
  • South Orange Village: Ban on single-use plastic bags, with a fee of up to $.25 on paper bags with a $.05 fee on paper bags
  • Teaneck: Up to a $.05 fee on plastic bags

These towns have plastic bans still being considered:

  • Atlantic Highlands
  • Chatham Borough
  • Chatham Township
  • Cranford
  • Garfield
  • Leonia
  • Livingston
  • Millburn
  • Montclair
  • New Milford
  • Newark
  • Northfield
  • Oradell
  • Paramus
  • Red Bank
  • Saddle Brook
  • Secaucus Town
  • Wyckoff

Click here to see the full list, or learn about our options for renting a dumpster in New Jersey.

 

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